Nea Paphos (Cyprus), 2016

Nea Paphos

 

Dates of work: 16 August–29 September 2016

 

Team:
Director: Dr. Henryk Meyza (Institute of Mediterranean and Oriental Cultures, Polish Academy of Sciences)
Archaeologists: Prof. Jolanta Młynarczyk (Institute of Archaeology, University of Warsaw; as Deputy Director), Assoc. Prof. Tomasz Scholl (Institute of Archaeology, University of Warsaw), Monika Więch (Institute of Mediterranean and Oriental Cultures, Polish Academy of Sciences), Julia Mikocka (PhD candidate, Antiquity of Southeastern Europe Research Centre, University of Warsaw), Marcin M. Romaniuk (PhD candidate, University of Warsaw; intern at Institute of Mediterranean and Oriental Cultures, Polish Academy of Sciences)
Architects: Dr. Aleksandra Brzozowska (Faculty of Architecture, Wrocław University of Science and Technology), Anna Kubicka (PhD candidate, Faculty of Architecture, Wrocław University of Science and Technology)
Students: Borowska Agata, Cegliński Arkadiusz, Czapska Katarzyna, Krzemień Weronika, Lis Bartłomiej, Rasa Nematullah, Warowna Magdalena, Żywicki Kacper (Institute of Archaeology, University of Warsaw); Elżbieta Napora, Agnieszka Folaron, Joanna Paska, Joanna Szewczyk (Faculty of Architecture, Wrocław University of Technology and Science)

Volunteer: Karolina Michałowska (Warsaw)

 

Excavation below the ancient ground surface of the main courtyard (1) of the “Hellenistic” House in Nea Paphos proved its construction to be later than the beginning of the 2nd century AD. A large rectangular basin and a smaller circular one were found under the western part of the courtyard and east of it. The larger basin had two phases, the first phase being more than a meter deeper than the second one. Strata under the floors of corridor A and room B were shown to belong to the Late Classical and incipient Hellenistic periods. Exploration also continued of a cistern in the southeastern part of the courtyard and of a well in the northeastern corner of the corridor. The building sequence of the porticoes in the main courtyard was investigated in a probe dug in the southwestern corner of the court, whereas the relation between the large reception hall with mosaic floor (10) and the so-called Roman House was tested in a trench dug in corridor 29. Further fragments of “Nabatean” capitals and other decorated blocks were found in pits that had been cut in the courtyard surface in antiquity. Finally, minor excavation at the southwestern corner of the House of Aion revealed a sequence of floors against the southern elevation of a building uncovered under the late Roman street B.

 

Text:Polish Archaeology in the Mediterranean 26/1

Contact

H. Meyza: hmeyza@iksio.pan.pl